In This Week’s Newsletter …

Tomato FoodOver-Feeding and Tomato Plants
Three reasons why less is better
Water, Rain and Tomato Plants

Tomato plants like it in moderation.

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What happens when your plants get too much food!
Your plants may not get some nutrients at all!

read more…

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Water, Rain & Tomato Plants
Tomato plants love lots and lots of water myth.

read more…

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The lack of sun over the past few months has reduced the size of the seeds in my Red Alert tomatoes!

How are yours doing?

4 Responses

  1. susheela
    | Reply

    It has been another disappointing year. I used to grow tomatoes at the back of the house and have had good results. However, since having the allotment, I thought i would make good use of the allotment. Fist it took ages to get it started due to lack of sunshine and then when it got going all the stems turned black. The same thing happened to rest of the allotment keepers. In furture I shall go back to growing them at the back of the house.

    • Nick
      | Reply

      Hi Susheela,
      Most of the allotment growers who I’ve spoken to have lost their tomato plants – it’s been too wet for growing tomatoes in exposed places.
      Regards,
      Nick

  2. Avril
    | Reply

    My toms are very dissapointing this year – or should I say just too slow!
    I live in southern Scotland and have 11 tomato plants in my PVC greenhouse. I have about 10 (unripe) tomatoes at the moment and have not tasted one yet this season!
    The plants with the unripe toms are Tumbling Tom and Red Alert!
    It is hard to believe it is August next week and I have not tasted one of my tomatoes yet!
    Fingers crossed for some improvement in the weather to make it all worth while!

    • Nick
      | Reply

      Hi Avril,
      This season has been very disappointing up until now. Normally we can nurse the plants through a few weeks of poor weather, but having had three months of almost constant rain, a number of tomato growers who contact me have had their plants ruined.
      It looks brighter now – if the plants are still healthy enough to make the most of it!
      Regards,
      Nick

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